Regarded as one of the greatest batsmen in the history of the sport, legendary Australian cricketer, Sir Don Bradman has his 110th birth anniversary today. Popularly known as ‘The Don’, was born on 27 August 1908 in Cootamundra, New South Wales. He was best known for leading an Australian team that went on a recording breaking unbeaten tour of England called “The Invincibles”

At the young age of 20, Bradman made his international debut. Playing for his home team Australia against England in 1928 at Brisbane. Bradman played his last Test match against the very same opposition right before he turned 40 in 1948.

His legendary career is packed with huge achievements and many highlights. In just 52 Test matches he was able to score 6996 runs with a hugely impressive average of 99.94. Not only that but the legend has 29 centuries to his name in just 80 International innings. To list all his achievements would require an article of its own but his batting average in first-class matches was 95.14. After finishing 234 matches he scored 28067 runs which had 117 hundred.

After his retirement, he still was active in the game by acting as an administrator, writer, and even selector for three decades. Among his many records he holds the highest career batting average, highest ratio of centuries and double centuries per innings, highest series batting average.

He created many records while being an active player, some of them include: being the first batsman to have scored two triple centuries, the first batsman to have scored a Test triple century at the #5 position. He is also the first batsman to have remained unbeaten on 299 in a Test inning.

His career is now a benchmark for many aspiring cricketers. Former Australian captain Bill Woodfull called said Bradman was worth three batsmen. Prime minister John Howard of Australi recalled him as the “Greatest living Australian” in 2001.

Unfortunately, in December of 2000, Bradman was hospitalized due to a case of pneumonia. Two months later he would take his last breath on 25 February 2001 at the age of 92. The ICC Cricket Hall of Fame inducted him in 2009.  Today, on his 110th birth anniversary, players and fans remember the legend. Even Google dedicated a doodle to him on this great day.